With so many potential publishing options available today, it’s difficult to know what’s best for your book – but help is at hand!

How do ‘mainstream’ and independent publishing differ, and how might an author’s publishing journey be different depending on the nature of the publisher (whether indie or not)?

Our panel, featuring Kevin Duffy of indie publisher Bluemoose Books, Comma Press Editor Ra Page, and Habiba Desai and Sara Razzaq of Fox & Windmill will explore how independent publishing compares with more traditional routes, and how you can make the right choice for your manuscript. 

 

About The Publishers

Kevin Duffy

Kevin Duffy worked in sales and marketing in publishing houses for 25 years. Kevin and his wife Hetha started Bluemoose Books in 2006. Their authors have been shortlisted for and have won several national and international literary prizes. Bluemoose books have been translated into several languages and are now sold in over 42 countries.

Headshot of Ra Page stood in front of a plain white wall

Ra Page

Ra Page is the founder and Editorial Manager of Comma Press. He is a former journalist, having been Deputy Editor for City Life magazine, and a former Director of Manchester Poetry Festival.

A headshot of Habiba Desai, co-founder of Fox and Windmill Publishing

Habiba Desai

Fox and Windmill is a publishing company set up by two postgraduate students, Habiba Desai and Sara Razzaq from the University of Huddersfield in March of last year.Taking the plunge during the second lockdown, the English grads launched their search for submissions for their first anthology collection, Into the Wilds, last year.
The publishing company was set up to bridge the gap in literature and publishing, with the aim of independently distributing authentic northern South Asian voices, without the need for a literary agent.

Headshot of Sara Razzaq, co-owner of Fox & Windmill publishing. She is wearing a headscarf and smiling at the camera

Sara Razzaq

Fox and Windmill is a publishing company set up by two postgraduate students, Habiba Desai and Sara Razzaq from the University of Huddersfield in March of last year.Taking the plunge during the second lockdown, the English grads launched their search for submissions for their first anthology collection, Into the Wilds, last year.

The publishing company was set up to bridge the gap in literature and publishing, with the aim of independently distributing authentic northern South Asian voices, without the need for a literary agent.